2020 • Page 3 of 6 • Raz Coaching for ADHD
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How One ADHD College Student Deals With Challenges

Listen to Ross, a college student with ADHD, talk with Academic and Career Coach Michelle Raz of Raz Coaching about his Challenges with ADHD as a college student.

In this episode Ross and Michelle dig deep into his journey through figuring out what works for him to be a successful college student managing ADHD on his own.   You will learn the words of advice Ross got to get through the boring and mundane work and how he had to look within himself to find solutions to his problems. The support source he has received enables him to face his failures and feeling of shame.  Hear what it took to get him on a positive academic path.

A key takeaway for him and pivotal question he began to ask himself when procrastination and low motivation set in was:

“Where has this procrastination led me in the past and did I like that?”

Learn where this journey has taken him

Hear where he is now academically

This is a great episode for parents of ADHD college students and motivational for ANY current or future college student.

Please forward and share with someone you feel needs to hear Ross’ story.

If you want more podcasts, blogs, videos on life with ADHD visit Michelle’s website at www.razcoaching.com  or www. coachingacademics.com. or email her at [email protected]  Also, you can  follow her at  www.Instagram.com/razcoaching. She has many mini blogs with tips of inspiration.   There’s something in one of her outlets there for you that can help you with your ADHD struggles and challenges.  She even has an App on her website to ask questions.   “Ask Raz!”.

 

Overcome Obstacles Instead of Being Overcome by Them

Overcome Obstacles Instead of Being Overcome by Them

Overcome Obstacles Instead of Being Overcome by Them

            A  4-part story of adversity, courage, hope and success for one TBI survivor

This is one of a four-part series of how one traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivor overcame obstacles to improve her quality of life when appropriate resources seemed out of reach.  These obstacles and challenges associated with TBI survivors include many skills associated with execution functions of the brain.  These skilled functions can be thought of as the command center of the brain that controls the cognitive processes such as decision-making, impulse control, attention, emotional regulation, and working memory.

Here is the first part of her story.

Healing is a continual process, but for this TBI Survivor, I made a choice to overcome obstacles instead of being overcome by them. Do not get me wrong, there have been, and still are some tough days, but with determination and a willingness to change, anything is possible.

What Happened…

Over eleven years ago, my life drastically changed on a fall day as I was driving to Steamboat Springs, Colorado in a snowstorm for a class.  We all know how Colorado weather can be; sunny one minute, a few miles down the road and a few minutes later, a complete whiteout has greeted you with full force. As I was making the final turn toward the West Summit of Rabbit Ears Pass, I noticed a vehicle fish-tailing on their side of the road and decided to pull as far right on the shoulder as I could hoping the car would pass, I could make a sarcastic comment about their driving, then be back on the way to class.

I did not make it to class but, I did survive a head-on collision with the side of the other driver’s vehicle.  Not only was life as I knew it changed but my ambitions for my career were crushed as well.

What changed?

Well, I went from being a semi-respected member of the community to the town joke.

Memory, balance, speech, processing, and cognitive issues made me different; insignificant in the minds of many who, instead of trying to understand the abrupt challenges in my life, people chose to judge and diagnose me to be someone I was not.  I lost friends, family members had no idea how to deal with me or communicate with me so, it was just easier for them to write me off as a “freak”.  People I called friends called me, “different, odd, awkward, and consistently inconsistent”.  Great on the self-esteem, I tell you (sarcastically speaking).

There were limited resources within the community I lived and the husband at the time, scared the crap out of me when he drove me to and from doctor appointments and surgeries. It took me over a year to get behind the wheel again.The marriage did not survive, but my mild traumatic brain injury was not the only reason.

Do you know what it is like to walk into the store or post office and see people whisper into one another’s ear while looking at you from the corner of their eye? Nah, they were definitely not talking about me, and they were so secretive, I had not noticed. Right…

I apparently hired a lawyer to represent my best interests but I don’t recall signing the paperwork, but when it was all said and done, I was hurt in the accident so they could benefit from my pain and suffering.  On one of the few encounters I remember with the lawyer’s Junior Associate (my mood swings and emotional dysregulation were too much for the real lawyer), it was mentioned that I should lose my home, be broke, and accept that I would never have worth-while employment for the rest of my life.

I guess if I had bought into what they were selling, they would have gotten more of my settlement, and they got most of it. That was just enough motivation for me to realize I did not want to be the person they decided I was going to be.  Boy, did I make a few sharks angry.  Who cares about what their words did to my self-esteem?

Oh yeah, being different means being insignificant, right?  Wrong!

One afternoon a year-and-a-half after my accident, I sat at my kitchen table in despair, crying, and thought I could not live the way I had being living anymore. I was afraid to drive, the help I was getting was minimal, and the then husband was about as available as a live operator in a computer-operated call center. I was ready to give up and had grown resigned to the idea of my disappointing new life, trying to find acceptance of my circumstances even though I struggled to accept the new me.

It was tough because I could still remember how I use to be, I just did not know how to reach that person.  We had been permanently disconnected. I sat at that kitchen table and surrendered and prayed.  Something had to give. Does anyone reading this understand where I am coming from or what I am talking about?

Within my next post, I will share about healing; Lisa style.

Until next time……

Lisa Marie Ansell, Guest Blogger

If you have anything to share please feel free to reach out to me at www.razcoaching.com  or www. coachingacademics.com. [email protected] Or follow my www.Instagram.com/razcoaching. I do daily mini blogs with tips of inspiration. I post almost every day.  There’s something in there for you that can help you with your focus for the day.

Can ADHD Be Mistaken for Autism?

Can ADHD Be Mistaken for Autism?

Can ADHD be mistaken for Autism?

Are some kids dealing with Autism misdiagnosed with ADHD?

Yes, absolutely!  There are overlapping conditions between the two.  Read on to read the full comparison by  The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM5)

How are these two disorders similar?

Many of the symptoms associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder are confused for ADHD, such as difficulty in settling down or focusing on something, ability to pay attention, impulsivity and social awkwardness.  These are the executive functioning skills: time management, organization, self-reflection, emotional regulation, and focus.

Yes, Autism and ADHD can look a lot similar as children with either has difficulty focusing. They have issues communicating; they might struggle with their schoolwork and so on. Although the two conditions share a lot of common symptoms, the two are very different conditions. Autism is a kind of developmental disorder that can impact language skills, social interactions, behavior and learning ability. ADHD affects the way the brain develops and grows. It is also possible at times that someone on the Autism spectrum is dealing with both, which would be called a comorbid condition.

So, how can we differentiate between the two conditions?

Look at the checklists below and compare and observe the behavior. All those dealing with autism struggle to focus on things that they dislike. For instance, if they don’t like to study, they cannot focus on reading for comprehension.  When they asked to read, they might fixate on things they like, such as watching a cartoon or playing their favorite game. Students dealing with ADHD lose interest in the initial phase and they try to avoid things asked to focus on. They can look similar.  The difference will be the severity in the autistic person and the other traits listed below.

You can also look at the way the person learns to communicate.

Although in both conditions, children struggle to communicate with others, those dealing with Autism are generally highly focused in their own world. They struggle to put words to their thoughts and fail to express their feelings. They also find it difficult to make eye contact with someone. On the other hand, a child dealing with ADHD can talk non-stop and can be very social. They can be talkative and challenging to stop them once they stop.

While an autism child loves to repeated events, those dealing with ADHD like to move onto the next interest. A child coping with Autism might like the consistent routine of things, whereas those with ADHD do not like to do the same thing over and over again. They like to explore new things often.

While these are samples that help differentiate between ADHD and Autism, there are many more characteristics considered before a diagnosis could occur.

The first and most important thing to do is to visit the doctor.  Let the expert decide what your child is going through if you suspect either condition. To diagnose ADHD, doctors generally look at the behavioral pattern of the child over time, for instance – not following the instructions, being forgetful, not listening to parents, fidgeting and so on. They ask for feedback from parents and teachers and draw a conclusion based on their observation and symptoms. The feedback for Autism is much more complicated.   Look below at the full DSM5 criteria the professional use to determine if it is ADHD or Autism.

 

Here are the full Diagnostic Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder from the www.cdc.gov site

  1. Persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across multiple contexts, as manifested by the following, currently or by history (examples are illustrative, not exhaustive; see text):
    1. Deficits in social-emotional reciprocity, ranging, for example, from abnormal social approach and failure of normal back-and-forth conversation; to reduced sharing of interests, emotions, or affect; to failure to initiate or respond to social interactions.
    2. Deficits in nonverbal communicative behaviors used for social interaction, ranging, for example, from poorly integrated verbal and nonverbal communication; to abnormalities in eye contact and body language or deficits in understanding and use of gestures; to a total lack of facial expressions and nonverbal communication.
    3. Deficits in developing, maintaining, and understand relationships, ranging, for example, from difficulties adjusting behavior to suit various social contexts; to difficulties in sharing imaginative play or in making friends; to absence of interest in peers.

Specify current severity:

Severity is based on social communication impairments and restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior.

  1. Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities, as manifested by at least two of the following, currently or by history (examples are illustrative, not exhaustive; see text):
    1. Stereotyped or repetitive motor movements, use of objects, or speech (e.g., simple motor stereotypes, lining up toys or flipping objects, echolalia, idiosyncratic phrases).
    2. Insistence on sameness, inflexible adherence to routines, or ritualized patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior (e.g., extreme distress at small changes, difficulties with transitions, rigid thinking patterns, greeting rituals, need to take same route or eat same food every day).
    3. Highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus (e.g., strong attachment to or preoccupation with unusual objects, excessively circumscribed or perseverative interests).
    4. Hyper- or hyperreactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of the environment (e.g. apparent indifference to pain/temperature, adverse response to specific sounds or textures, excessive smelling or touching of objects, visual fascination with lights or movement).

Specify current severity:

Severity is based on social communication impairments and restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior.

  1. Symptoms must be present in the early developmental period (but may not become fully manifest until social demands exceed limited capacities, or may be masked by learned strategies in later life).
  2. Symptoms cause clinically significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of current functioning.
  3. These disturbances are not better explained by intellectual disability (intellectual developmental disorder) or global developmental delay. Intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder frequently co-occur; to make comorbid diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability, social communication should be below that expected for general developmental level

 

DSM-5 Criteria for ADHD

People with ADHD show a persistent pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity–impulsivity that interferes with functioning or development:

 

  1. Inattention: Six or more symptoms of inattention for children up to age 16 years, or five or more for adolescents age 17 years and older and adults; symptoms of inattention have been present for at least 6 months, and they are inappropriate for developmental level:
    1. Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, at work, or with other activities.
    2. Often has trouble holding attention on tasks or play activities.
    3. Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly.
    4. Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (e.g., loses focus, side-tracked).
    5. Often has trouble organizing tasks and activities.
    6. Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to do tasks that require mental effort over a long period of time (such as schoolwork or homework).
    7. Often loses things necessary for tasks and activities (e.g. school materials, pencils, books, tools, wallets, keys, paperwork, eyeglasses, mobile telephones).
    8. Is often easily distracted
    9. Is often forgetful in daily activities.
  2. Hyperactivity and Impulsivity: Six or more symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity for children up to age 16 years, or five or more for adolescents age 17 years and older and adults; symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity have been present for at least 6 months to an extent that is disruptive and inappropriate for the person’s developmental level:
    1. Often fidgets with or taps hands or feet, or squirms in seat.
    2. Often leaves seat in situations when remaining seated is expected.
    3. Often runs about or climbs in situations where it is not appropriate (adolescents or adults may be limited to feeling restless).
    4. Often unable to play or take part in leisure activities quietly.
    5. Is often “on the go” acting as if “driven by a motor”.
    6. Often talks excessively.
    7. Often blurts out an answer before a question has been completed.
    8. Often has trouble waiting their turn.
    9. Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games)
The accurate diagnosis of the condition starts when you start talking to the doctor about behavior, what he/she dislikes, what they struggle with.  Apart from the symptoms and behavioral patterns, some more tools and tests are conducted to understand what the client is dealing with.

Fortunately, there are many resources available today to help distinguish the two conditions and behavioral plan options to help live the most productive and fulfilled life.

If you have anything to share please feel free to reach out to me at www.razcoaching.com  or www. coachingacademics.com. [email protected] Or follow my www.Instagram.com/razcoaching. I do daily mini blogs with tips of inspiration. I post almost every day.  There’s something in there for you that can help you with your focus for the day.

 

Online School Questions Answered

Online School Questions Answered

3 Online School Questions Answered

Welcome to the ADHD strategist where we come together to talk about living with ADHD. We are here to discuss the challenges and applying strategies that we face living with the disorder in ourselves or our family and how to stay in control with our lives. I

Online schooling can be great because you can work at your own pace but it can also be difficult when you’re needing extra support or you’re needing to make sure that you’re getting things done for accountability. I have three questions today that I’ve been asked recently that I want to share with you and I hope that I’ll help you and your experience with this online schooling.

1. Do I need to enforce where
my student studies?

2. My student takes forever
to do their work,
is there something I can do
to help them be faster?

3. My student gets frustrated
so easily and gives up before
he/she can get help,
what can I do?

If you have more questions and you are still stuck and you can’t find the answers on my website with some of the articles I’ve written, try my Ask Raz! app on my website where I answer relevant ADHD and executive function questions. Thanks for listening today. www.razcoaching.com or Instagram.com/razcoaching where I offer daily motivation tips advice and humor.

3 Online School Questions Answered

Welcome to the ADHD strategist where we come together to talk about living with ADHD. We are here to discuss the challenges and applying strategies that we face living with the disorder in ourselves or our family and how to stay in control with our lives. I

Online schooling can be great because you can work at your own pace but it can also be difficult when you’re needing extra support or you’re needing to make sure that you’re getting things done for accountability. I have three questions today that I’ve been asked recently that I want to share with you and I hope that I’ll help you and your experience with this online schooling.

1. Do I need to enforce where
my student studies?

2. My student takes forever
to do their work,
is there something I can do
to help them be faster?

3. My student gets frustrated
so easily and gives up before
he/she can get help,
what can I do?

If you have more questions and you are still stuck and you can’t find the answers on my website with some of the articles I’ve written, try my Ask Raz! app on my website where I answer relevant ADHD and executive function questions. Thanks for listening today. www.razcoaching.com or Instagram.com/razcoaching where I offer daily motivation tips advice and humor.

10 Myths about choosing a career debunked

10 Myths about choosing a career debunked

10 Myths Debunked and your Negative Beliefs

Many beliefs can limit yourself in pursuing your career or lead you down a career path that is not a good match for you.  It is important to know yourself and the type of career you are considering and the requirements you need to be successful in the career.  You could get headed in the wrong direction for years if you hold onto some of these beliefs that do not match up with your personal characteristics, interests and dream.

10 Myths about choosing a career debunked

1.  All people who are good at music make successful musicians.

The problem with this kind of statement is that it leaves out many details it takes to be a musician.  There are skills needed to be successful.  As well as knowing how to play music, there is a commitment to practice or interpersonal skills to help promote the music and financial components for budgeting.

2.  All people who learn differently (LD) should go to vocational training programs

People who learn differently and have a strong support system, have gone on to have great careers as in business, science and entertainment industry. There is a learned gift developed by having to navigate life when you have a learning difference. It is the tenacity to work through problems, rebound from failure and celebrate the smaller step successes as they learn patience.   If the passion and desire to work toward the career goal is there, you can reach it.

3. All people with ADHD are creative and should own businesses.

While creativity is a hallmark trait used to describe people with ADHD, it doesn’t mean they have the operation skills to own a business.  The skills it takes to own a business include time management, long-range thinking, financial discipline, interpersonal skills and more.  It takes a lot of hard work and knowing when to pull in help through resources to run a successful business.

4. All people with good grades become top professionals

People that inherently get good grades and don’t have to work hard in school may not have developed adequate coping skills needed to deal with the stress and obstacles. It can hinder themselves in striving for high professional success levels.

5. All people who are good with people should go into sales.

Excellent interpersonal skills are needed in the sales industry as well as a tough as nail attitude for rejection and failure.  If you are sensitive to rejection and struggle to motivate after a letdown, then sales can be a challenging field for you.

6.  All people who make career changes later in life are discriminated against.

People may fear what others may perceive with a late in life career change, but could they be curious and even envious?  YOU can be the trailblazer to model how it can be done for others.  Your perception may be at play in a situation like this.

7.  All people with good educational backgrounds do well in careers.

Education is just a piece of the puzzle that makes up what it takes to do well in a given career.   Education is another way to get an edge on your career, but the other factors are equally important.

8.  All people with special challenges can expect to achieve less in their lifetimes.

This is a great myth to bust as we can go through the list of people with challenges that have contributed enormously to our society.  Hellen Keller, Walt Disney, Albert Einstein, Keanue Reeves, just to name a few.

9.  All people who made career choice mistakes should start over

This is the time to pull together the lessons learned and see how it may apply to something within their career choice.  Within a career field, there are many options.  For example, If your dream was to be an actor because you love the creative aspect of films but found that you do not like the stress of memorizing lines,  look at closely related field within the film industry such as production management or scene development or  coaching.

10.  All people have one true career destiny.

It is unusual to find someone who has stayed within one career their whole life these days.  People have many options to work from home and this has opened up options for people to investigate free-lance fields that bring a variety of work options and paths to consider.  As we go through life, your needs and interests change.  Our society is accepting of new ways to employ people and judge their performance wherever they are based.  This lends itself to allowing people the freedom to pursue dreams that may not have been thought possible in the past.

Go for your potential in life!

by debunking these 10 Myths about choosing a career

There are many opinions out there for every statement made regarding a career path one might choose.  Do not limit your potential in life by believing everything at face value.  Look at the counter-argument like I did in the above scenarios. This type of critical response is a process to get in touch with your true inner beliefs.

If you have an interest and desire for a career path and see a personal limitation that would keep you from being successful, I encourage to go through the exercises of debunking the thought with an alternative view.  This could be the first step in gaining the courage to face a challenge with the attitude of how can I navigate in this career field WITH my limitation?  Is this an area I can work on to improve or do I need to find a modification or accommodation to be successful.  Turn to techniques that bringer you closer to realizing the dream career such visualization or enlisting someone that can help you develop strategies in your weaknesses.

Your determination and consistent pursuit of the career can happen.

One of the earliest documented stories that I am aware of dates back to the 1960s.  This was a period where people with disabilities where looked upon as defects and often hidden from the public by families out of shame and fear. Christy Brown, artist and author,     fought every day for something and struggled with his inner critic to motivate and persevere. He began his passion for painting and writing to escape his burden of daily living and earned enough from his work to earn a living.

His first published book was translated into 5 languages writing it on a typewriter using only his left toes. In the first chapter of the book, My Left Foot, Brown describes how he could not be truly happy in life if he viewed himself simply as a cripple.  He wanted more and created ways to make his dreams into realities despite not have arms not being able to walk.

He shattered these 10 Myths about choosing a career!

He says in a 1962 interview that it was when he was able to accept himself for who he was combined with the immense support of his family, that he was able to succeed in life.  He offers advice to other people with disabilities that, with the right support, you can overcome any challenge.  As he says, we all have challenges.  Perhaps it is simply a mindset that sets apart this remarkable early example of overcoming tremendous difficulties to reach a fulfilling career and life.

Christy Brown’s accomplishment included artists, internationally best selling author and poet.  This example of overcoming odds, fear, having courage and face stigmas and myth of people with disabilities in Dublin, Ireland, is quite remarkable at a time when people commonly institutionalized anyone with mental or physical disabilities. His life story may have set a precedent in other countries to shift their limiting beliefs of the capacity of people with disabilities as a collective force.  He is one of the first inspirations for any suffering with any type of challenge.

10 Myths about choosing a career debunked!

If you have anything to share please feel free to reach out to me at www.razcoaching.com  or www. coachingacademics.com. [email protected] Or follow my www.Instagram.com/razcoaching. I do daily mini blogs with tips of inspiration. I post almost every day.  There’s something in there for you that can help you with your focus for the day.

5 Motivation Tips For Your Teen At Home

5 Motivation Tips For Your Teen At Home

5 Motivation Tips For Your Teen At Home

Motivating your teenager at home is hard even on a good day.  But As we are in the middle of our stay at home orders, it is getting even harder.   In this episode, Michelle shares 5 motivational tips that can get your teen moving in the right direction with good spirits.

Michelle is a mother of 3 and has a lot of experience motivating her own kids and hundreds of other teenagers through her work with academic and career coaching over the years.

She will share here wisdom and insight with these helpful 5 motivations tips for your teen at home during this crisis.

In the previous episode she focused on helping you navigate the online classes and assignments with her specialized 6 Step Online Planner.  You can view it HERE

Coach Raz has been an academic coach for over 10 years and you can find more details at razcoaching.com  or coachingacademics.com

How to Create My Online Planner in 6 Steps

How to Create My Online Planner in 6 Steps

How to Create My Online Planner in 6 Steps

I’d like to share with you a tool that I use with many of my clients. It’s an online planner. It’s a great tool if you need help with visual auditory and kinesthetic learning. It helps with motivation time management and just a great visual to get you started.

Each month the first step in using this planner is to create a Google spreadsheet. If you don’t have an account with Google, go ahead and make one. Once you have that account, then you will need to have all of your subjects or goals ahead of time so that you can put them across the top of the Google Sheet.

Once you complete this, color code them and then move on to the days the week on the left side of the spreadsheet. You’re going to put in the month and then below the month if you spell out the day of the week. Use the numeric number for the month date and year. If you highlight that box and drag it down, it will automatically populate all the days of the month. Once you do that, go ahead and save the document for the purpose of this. You can just say your name and you can say academic planner or you can say your name with planning goals. So that’s step 1.

Step 2:

Have all of your assignments due dates, tests, projects ready. You can find these in your syllabus or instructor’s website. Once you have those due dates. Go ahead and backfill them in. Start with the end in mind. Put in the due dates on the particular date that it’s due and then go ahead and put in homework assignments and anything else.

Step 3:

Now you have all of the assignments in and the big tests. What I’d like you to do now is to go through those important test dates, presentations, project deadlines and use the paint bucket tool at the top of the Google spreadsheet. You can click on it and choose the color palette. I like to use red just as a reminder since it stands out that it is an important due date. Go ahead and use that tool and highlight the cell that that particular date is due and color code it red.

Step 4:

What I’d like to do here is start with the end in mind and backtrack to chunk down the steps. It’s going to help you to be ready for that test presentation or project and make sure you’re giving yourself ample time. I like to tell students if you think that you’re over planning and giving yourself too much time, it’s not really true. Because what you’re doing is building in a what-if plan. You know life happens and you might not be feeling well or you might not be motivated on a particular day. If you have enough planning blocks set for that specific test or important project, then you have a little buffer built-in. So, it’s a good idea to just over plan and break down these steps into kind of micro, small chunks of blocks

 Step 5:

You should have everything entered.  What I like to do now is to go through and just bold out the subjects across the top.  Make sure the dates are bold and then I put in anything red in bold too.  It is really visually standing out for an important thing for you know you need to do. This is where the students really visually like this calendar.  As you are completing an assignment, your accountability is to yourself by color, coding it using the paint bucket. Highlight the cell light blue as you complete things.   The goal is to have as much blue on that page as you can possibly get.

Sometimes students like to even put their test scores on there too so they can go back and look at it in a different month and see that progress. Another thing you can do is to use the strikethrough key for missed work. Maybe you missed an assignment you were going to do but want to track it, so you’re going to use the strikethrough tool at the top. It’ll serve the purpose of letting you know that it was something that didn’t happen. It may be something you forgot to do and other times, it might be professors moving things around or occasionally they just abandoned things.

So, now you have the color-coding blue for completion or the strike-through if it’s a special circumstance and just didn’t happen and red for important things. Sometimes things are not always done, but they’re in progress. So on that we’re going to use the yellow bucket tool and highlight those so that you know you paid attention to it you’re on track. Still, you’re not quite done with it yet and you need to go through using this color-coding system will really help you know at a glance where you are what you need to get done and what your next step is supposed to be.

Step 6:

Now you’ve completed one month’s worth of work. Add a new month at the bottom of the spreadsheet by hitting the plus button rename it for the particular month you want to  copy and paste your subjects at the top.   Use the date populated that I discussed on the first step and start all over again!

Best of luck out there.

If you have anything to share please feel free to reach out to me at www.razcoaching.com  or www. coachingacademics.com. [email protected] Or follow my www.Instagram.com/razcoaching. I do daily mini blogs with tips of inspiration. I post almost every day.  There’s something in there for you that can help you with your focus for the day.