career development Archives • Page 2 of 8 • Raz Coaching for ADHD
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Create Great Employees: Employers Listen Up!

How To Create Great Employees:  It is The Invisible Economic Strain In Our Workforce that you can change!

In this Episode Listen to Michelle Talk about this topic.  Create great employees:   In a labor market that is at a historic low, businesses are seeing a high rate of turnover and even ghosting in the workplace.  It is a costly trend. Companies are seeing the value in shifting how they train to retain their employees.  It is far less expensive to invest in quality training.  A community mindset work culture that promotes employee retention is best; rather than continually training new employees.  Also, this nurtured environment promotes employee’s self-worth.  The end result is better work engagement and deeper relationships with fellow colleagues.

The result is better morale, work productivity and lower employee turnover rates!

The positive workplace connections and better knowledge base for the demands of their job has the potential for big payoffs.  It is a benefit for the company in reduced hiring costs as well. This creates a win-win scenario.  Talks of expanding apprenticeship programs are on the rise.

In order for the efforts to be successful, it is important to understand what challenges this group faces.  As a result, this will ensure quality training for the companies that want to train and hire them.

According to research, there are approximately 20 million college students who entered college in the fall of 2018.  19.4% self-reported having a disability.  This number has nearly doubled from 10 years ago and the impact on the educational system has been tremendous.   Colleges across the U.S. are developing programs to meet the needs of these diverse students.  The most prevalent disability is ADHD, a neurologically based disorder.

Of the students surveyed, 79% of the students who reported a disability listed ADHD as their challenge.

As these students enter our workforce, it would be beneficial for us to help them transition with strong skillsets.   Often, these neurologically diverse groups need specific guidance and training. Unfortunately,  skill sets may be assumed and overlooked for the average employee. This invisible disability flies under the radar and yet has a very impactful effect on job success. 

 “knowledge itself is power.”

Michelle R. Raz, M.A. Ed., is a professional executive function coach and educational consultant. Raz Coaching specializes in helping people with executive function challenges find careers they will love and land them. Read more at www.razcoaching.com/about Or sign up for the weekly blog.   Or purchase my new book Happiness+Passion+Purpose.  It is full of exercises and strategies you can put to use immediately.

ADHD: The Invisible Economic Strain In Our Workforce that you can change!

ADHD: The Invisible Economic Strain In Our Workforce that you can change!

ADHD: The Invisible Economic Strain In Our Workforce that you can change!

In a labor market that is at a historic low, businesses are seeing a high rate of turnover and even ghosting in the workplace.  It is a costly trend. Companies are seeing the value in shifting how they train to retain their employees.  It is far less expensive to invest in quality training while implementing a community mindset work culture that promotes retention than to continually train new employees.  Also, this nurtured environment promotes employee’s self-worth, work engagement and relationships with fellow colleagues.

The result is better morale, work productivity and lower employee turnover rates.

The positive workplace connections and better knowledge base for the demands of their job has the potential for big payoffs for the company in reduced hiring costs as well. Even governmental entities have recently voiced a need for diverse career options and training for this finicky labor pool. Talks of expanding apprenticeship programs are on the rise.

In order for the efforts to be successful, it is important to understand what challenges this group faces and how to best meet their needs.  This will ensure quality training for the companies that want to train and hire them.

According to the NCES there are approximately 20 million college students who entered college in the fall of 2018.  19.4% self-reported having a disability.  This number has nearly doubled from 10 years ago.  The impact on the educational system has been tremendous.   Colleges across the U.S. are developing programs to meet the needs of these diverse students.  The most prevalent disability is ADHD, a neurologically based disorder.

Of the students surveyed, 79% of the students who reported a disability listed ADHD as their challenge.

As these students enter our workforce, it would be beneficial for us to help them transition with a foundational employee skillset.   Often, these neurologically diverse groups need specific guidance and training that may be assumed and overlooked for the average employee. This invisible disability flies under the radar and yet has a very impactful effect on job success. 

As Sir Francis Bacon, stated in his Meditationes Sacrae (1597), “knowledge itself is power.”

It is at this point that we can illuminate the challenges around ADHD and take a look at ways to help them manage it and capitalize on their strengths.

For the ADHD employee, goals often seem to slip out of reach due to under managed and a misunderstood condition.  While no two people with the diagnoses are identical, here are common challenges associated with having an ADHD diagnosis.

Employees may have trouble:
  • Prioritizing & Procrastination
    The workload may become too burdensome if they do not have a clear hierarchal & strategic plan. Procrastination may set in.
  •  Initiating and Completing Tasks
    Tasks can be daunting and many distractions can derail them from starting and finishing them
  •  Organizing
    Without a priority system, often people do not know where to begin to organize their workspace.
  • Concentration
    While an ADHDer can hyper focus on something that is particularly interesting to them, it is difficult for them to concentrate on mundane work. It can feel overly boring to them and cause them to seek more gratifying interests breaking their ability to focus on what they KNOW they should be working on  ie…filing papers, etc.
  • Time Management
    This may make them late for work or important events and fall behind on projects in the workplace. This happens even with the best of intentions to be on time.
  • Impulsive Behavior
    Difficulty controlling anger and blurt thoughts without much filter that can come across as rude and insulting.
  • Following Directions
    Since the ability to remember information may take several steps that require focus, following directions can be difficult.

 

These behaviors often derail careers, ambitions, and relationships.

It is not uncommon to experience a high rate of job turnover due to either the person’s impulsive choice to leave the job or their behavior gets them fired. This can have a lasting effect on the person leaving, especially one that has been diagnosed with ADHD.  They may struggle with feeling shame and low-self esteem and become discouraged in their ability to perform in a job.

Employers who gain an understanding of the condition can create successful training, apprenticeships and mentoring programs that will promote better employee retention.

You do not have to have a disability to take advantage of some actions steps that can help the work flow and dynamics for employees. There are many life factors that can contribute to an employees work attitude and performance.  All can benefit from implementing company strategies that address these issues. In part II of this blog, I will address the issues with some helpful tips for employers to implement for all employees.

Raz Coaching specializes in helping people with executive function challenges and find careers they will love and land them. Read more at www.razcoaching.com/about Or sign up for the weekly blog or purchase my new book Happiness+Passion+Purpose.  It is packed full of exercises and strategies you can put to use immediately.

 

ADHD Coaching: My Personal Road

In this episode, I share with you my own personal road to ADHD coaching.  It has been many years, since I went down the road to research, investigate strategies and find the help my family needed.  It inspired me to launch a career in ADHD coaching over a decade ago. I am still going strong at it!  I look for new ways to inspire people and provide guidance on their own journey to find strategies that will work in their lives.

So that’s what is what has driven my passion for ADHD. Over many years I’ve been able to help hundreds of people. This journey has turned into  my passion and purpose.  I continue to want to share this with other people.

At Raz Coaching, I specialize in helping people with executive function challenges associated with ADHD, PTSD, Stress, TBI’s and ASD find careers they will love and land them

If you have a story to share about your own journey with ADHD, I would like to hear it.  email at [email protected] or visit my website for more information at www.razcoaching.com .   Or My academic site at www.coachingacademics.com
where you can learn how I help students succeed in college.    My academic coaching program is designed specifically for people who struggle with executive function challenges.  This is a very structure and high accountability program. It specifically deals with time management, working memory, procrastination, motivation and emotional regulation.  People have called it THE SILVER BULLET to college success!

If you know of someone that might need ADHD help, please send them to my website where they can gain a lot information for free.

 

12 Resources for Career Development and Lifelong Learning

12 Resources for Career Development and Lifelong Learning

Benefits of Lifelong Learning

Employers always seek the best-qualified candidates, and they often look at how recently you have been trained in a skill. They are also likely to be impressed if you have job-relevant certificates or certifications. If you can show recent certifications, workshops, and newly acquired skills you will assure the prospective employer that you have a lot to contribute—and, just as importantly, that you are dedicated and proactive when it comes to being the best you can be at your job.

adhd resourcesLifelong learning is also personally beneficial. You may learn about emerging skills or jobs that are a better fit for your life’s goals and values than what you have right now. You may even find yourself in a good position to become a consultant or entrepreneur if you are particularly good at keeping up with industry trends.

Often the biggest hurdle to engaging in new learning is the fear of failure. Just like when applying to jobs, we may be anxious about not performing well on continuing education coursework.

Once we are engaged, we often find the fears are not realities, and that we enjoy whatever was making us anxious! I have a hard time naming a client who hasn’t found that they enjoyed the challenge of continued learning—and the benefits that came with it—once they undertook it.

There is no right or wrong way to receive new training. The list below is some of my favorite places to go to for knowledge and skill training. If you need a degree, certificate, or just the self-confidence, stop procrastinating and go for it.

Online Resources

YouTube: Many colleges and universities have online lectures on YouTube for free.

Udemy: Udemy is a global learning and teaching marketplace. EdX.org: Founded by Harvard University and MIT in 2012, edX is an online learning destination and MOOC provider. It offers high-quality courses from the world’s best universities and institutions.

Coursera.org: Coursera provides courses taught by top instructors from the world’s best universities and educational institutions and you’ll receive a shareable electronic Course Certificate.

khanacademy.org: Khan Academy is a personalized learning resource for all ages. They offer practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard.

Openculture.com: Open Culture centralizes online courses, movies, audio, eBooks, and other content for any user all of it free.

Stanford Free Online Adult Courses: Activities range from recorded special talks on iTunes to Master’s Degree classes.

Federal Services

The Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration (ETA) can be a great asset as it provides information on training programs and other services for workers who have been, or will be, laid off.

The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation: this resource helps provide people who face mental, emotional, or physical challenges to employment by teaching relevant skills.

Conditions that may qualify you for assistance through the Department of Vocational Rehabilitation can include ADHD, anxiety, depression, PTSD, traumatic brain injury, and physical injuries that limit your ability to do certain types of work. Their goal is to help everyone be employed.

Vocational Technical Centers: Although for decades the emphasis in America has been on going to a four-year college, there are tens of millions of high-paying jobs that do not require a bachelor’s degree. Instead, these jobs require specialized, highly technical, and hands-on training—vocational training.

High-paying careers that require technical training instead of a bachelor’s degree include truck drivers, cosmetologists (hair stylists and other types of style experts), auto mechanics, electricians, welders, line workers for power companies, oil rig workers, and Information Technology experts such as cybersecurity experts.

Schools that specialize in each of these professions—and many more—can be found on the internet. Some may be attached to community colleges, while others such as trucking, power line work, or oil rigging, may be run directly by employers,.

These companies are eager to fill openings with trained workers, and in some cases may even have scholarship or reduced cost tuition programs available for people who are interested in the field, but are concerned about the cost of training to become qualified.

Community Resources

Colleges:

Most colleges offer online courses for which you can receive credit. They may also allow enrollment in in-person courses on an as-needed basis instead of as a full-time student. These can be helpful if you are trying to work towards a degree or certificate.

Community Centers:

Community Centers are organizations, often funded by government grants, that help people gain skills, knowledge, and find opportunities for business and employment. These centers are most common in urban areas but may also be found in smaller cities or towns.

Services commonly offered by Community Centers include résumé and cover letter assistance, job training resources, and networking opportunities. Think of Community Centers as you would a college’s Career Center. The only difference is they serve all taxpayers, including non-student workers and businesspeople.

Apprenticeships:

An apprenticeship is a training system in which a newcomer to a career field assists an experienced worker in that field, and rapidly gains expertise and experience in the process.

Apprenticeships are not as common as they once were, but it is sometimes possible to create an apprenticeship opportunity, if you are sufficiently enthusiastic about the career field, and are able to form a personal connection with an expert.

Experts and business owners are often eager to have assistants who are highly motivated to learn all aspects of the trade or business. For them, having a new employee who is eager to learn exactly how they do things might be preferable to trying to hire regular employees who may or may not be interested in learning and taking on more responsibilities over time.

It is important to note that unlike internships, apprenticeships are regulated by the federal government. While internships are often very brief and unpaid, or “paid in experience,” under the Apprenticeship Act employers must pay apprentices a monthly stipend. Apprenticeships usually last for 6 months to a year.

Lifelong learning keeps you in touch with our rapidly changing society and keeps you active, happy, and positively challenged which will enhance your career path.

Raz Coaching specializes in helping people with executive function challenges associated with ADHD,  Stress, TBI’s and ASD find careers they will love and land them. Read more at www.razcoaching.com/about Or sign up for the weekly blog and learn about my new book Happiness+Passion+Purpose.

 

The Under Used Tactic to Land a Job: Informational Interviewing

The Under Used Tactic to Land a Job: Informational Interviewing

Informational interviewing might just be the best way to get a job and yet it is underused by most job seekers.  Whenever I work with a career development client and we get to the informational interviewing step, I am met with hesitance and  resistance. I get it!  Cold calling is a scary and dreaded way to talk to a potential employer, but it is so effective!

Really, the problem is that  It is misunderstood and overlooked as a means to get a foot in the door for a job.

Interview call

Think of an information interview meeting as a networking opportunity. This is a one-on-one meeting with a key person in a field that you have a high interest in.

It may be that you have preconceived ideas about a particular career. Information interviewing can give you a better sense of what it would be like to work in the field you’ve chosen. It is first-hand, realistic, information you can use to form your idea of your ideal career.

An informational interview is less formal than a real interview. It allows you the opportunity to show off your personality, your skills, interests, and aptitude in a semi-relaxed atmosphere. Because of this, you will likely come across as more authentic to the interviewer. An informational interview gives a prospective employer better insight into who you are, and how you might be a good fit for the organization in the near future. This is a win-win situation for everyone.

“Foot in the door”

At the typical interview that follows an application, you might feel that you’re in an interview mill—the interviewer bored with all the candidates and simply saying, “Next. Next,” after each interview. This may leave you feeling less than confident in your ability to outperform the next person. With an information interview, you aren’t going to be competing for a time slot, and chances are the interviewer has 15-20 minutes they can carve out of their busy day to talk shop. Many people enjoy this opportunity to talk about themselves, and about how they got to where they are, as well as to help young job-seekers find a springboard from which to launch their careers.

Because informational interviews are less formal—and stressful—the conversations usually flow easier.   Remember, you aren’t there to ask for a job. You’re only there to learn. You want information that will help guide you in the direction of the career best suited for YOU. This means you are the one in control of the questions and the outcome of the interview. This is a great time to let your guard down a little, let your true personality shine, as well as briefly showcase how your skills benefit the company. You can also take the opportunity to ask more strategic questions—questions that help you, but perhaps would not be appropriate at a real interview. You can ask about benefits, salary, and even the social climate of the organization without portraying yourself in a negative light.

Gain insight, and Practice Interviewing

This is the opportunity for you to come in prepared to ask the right questions. People enjoy telling their story and you can get a real sense of what the company or career might be like, and so determine whether your chosen career is truly a good fit for you.

Additionally, if some parts of the interview process intimidate you, this is an excellent way to come up with a game-plan and practice. Remember practice ONLY makes for improvement.

Mentorship

If you feel a connection with the person you meet with, you may well have lucked into a mentoring relationship opportunity. Your interviewer might really be impressed with the initiative you show by requesting an informational interview, and may be willing to offer further advice and support. And this goes both ways. Because of the rapport you build in this interview, you yourself might ask for further guidance via follow ups which we’ll talk about later in this chapter.

How to conduct yourself at the interview

  • You should regard each interview as a business appointment and conduct yourself in a professional manner.
  • Write a THANK YOU NOTE to the people you have interviewed. Report back to them if you have followed up on any suggestions.

The last thing to remember is that informational interviews are extremely effective. How effective? According to Dr. Randall Hansen, founder of Quintessential Careers, one of the oldest and most comprehensive career development sites on the web, “While one out of every 200 resumes (some studies put the number as high as 1,500 resumes) results in a job offer, one out of every 12 informational interviews results in a job offer.”

Informational Interviews are so effective that despite that the stated aim is NOT to get a job, many  Informational Interviews still end up with a job offer.

So, go ahead and pick up that phone, you may just land a job!

To read more about interviewing, resumes and finding your passion career, purchase my book

Happiness + Passion + Purpose Book A Step By Step Guide On How To Nourish The Patterns Of Your Life Into The Job You Will Love And Land It!