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Disrupt Your Career with This Course

Disrupt Your Career with This Course

What is Career Exploration Webinar Course about?

This Disrupt Your Career Exploration Webinar course concentrates on looking into one’s strength, interests, personality, aptitude and creating strategies to overcome any obstacles related to executive functioning deficits that may keep one from pursuing their dreams in a particular career.

How can this class help me?

If you are struggling with deciding what career is best for you or how to incorporate your best strengths into a career, this will help you to reach your own potential in a given career.

Who is this class geared toward?

This is course is best for a college student or recent graduate. High school students who are looking at which major to declare will find this beneficial as well.

What types of things will I be working on?

  • Career Development and early career dreams and interest
  • Skills, accomplishment and aptitude
  • How personality traits factor into career choices
  • Prioritizing work and leisure values
  • Personal challenges and possibilities to overcome them

Is this class for graduating seniors in high school or younger?

Yes, if they are contemplating which major to pursue or career path

Is this class for students in college?

Yes, this is an excellent course to identify your strengths, interests and pathway to your dream career. Or make sure you are on the right track and what steps to take next.

What about adults taking this class who are in the workplace?

This would be a good course for adults who are feeling that they may need a change of career to redefine themselves or find a new passion that better aligns with their interests, skills and lifestyle. We will be offering a class geared towards this type of client in the near future.

DON’T MISS THE ONE COURSE THAT COULD CHANGE YOUR LIFE!

Disrupt Your Career

Learn MORE HERE:

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Dark Side of Remote Learning

COVID 19 has caused a pandemic that brought a lot of changes to our way of living. One of the most affected areas is education, especially for students with disabilities. The pandemic has resulted in schools shut all across the world and as a result, education has changed drastically with the rise of remote learning where lectures will take place remotely on digital platforms.

While schools are having a transition from traditional face to face classes to online education, there are several issues that must be given attention to. A big portion of that is the disadvantages of remote learning to students with ADHD.

The following are the potential Dark side of remote learning. Barriers to education through remote-learning practices that students with disabilities may encounter along the process discussed in this podcast episode:

  • Need for one on one instructional support challenges.
  • Behavior Modification and intervention needs.
  • Mental Health issues:  Depression, Anxiety, and Isolation.

Students with disabilities are at higher risk due to the needs and impacts for remote learning mentioned above. Amid the challenges and risks, the most important thing to keep in mind is the education and safety of students and teachers must be balanced. Education is important but enjoying and learning through the process is what makes it more valuable.

Can you think of other challenges that might get in the way during remote learning sessions?

Let me know!  go ahead and Ask Raz! for personal feedback, just click the link: https://www.razcoaching.com/ask_raz/

If you have anything to share please feel free to reach out to me at www.razcoaching.com  or www. coachingacademics.com. [email protected] Or follow my www.Instagram.com/razcoaching. I do daily mini blogs with tips of inspiration.  There’s something in there for you that can help you with your focus for the day.

Covid and College Challenges

Covid and College Challenges

College time may be fun and exciting.  But it also has a fair share of challenges especially now that Covid-19 has affected everything including education

Becoming a college freshman is a big step to young adulthood. It is the most awaited time for students to finally have their freedom, freedom from home, freedom from their parents’ rules, and freedom from high school.  Entering college is a new era of making friends and opening up themselves to the excitement and fear that goes along with it.

Adapting to the new normal things has never been easy. Let’s discuss some of the possible challenges that you may encounter along your college journey. What possible solutions can you do to still create memories?

Now that the COVID 19 has turned the world upside down and schools have transitioned to online learning, you might feel that you’re still stuck to where you are before, you still live in the same house as your parents and you still have to follow their rules. You can think of it that way, but you can make it the best time to learn more about what you can improve and develop in yourself. Leaving home can be pretty exciting but being ready before leaving is another level.

Can you cite other examples of Covid and College Challenges you might encounter in your first year as college students that are not listed above? I’m here to listen, Ask Raz! Leave me a message. Just click the link: https://www.razcoaching.com/ask_raz/
or visit my instagram www.instagram.com/razcoaching

Overcome Obstacles Instead of Being Overcome by Them

Overcome Obstacles Instead of Being Overcome by Them

Overcome Obstacles Instead of Being Overcome by Them

            A  4-part story of adversity, courage, hope and success for one TBI survivor

This is one of a four-part series of how one traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivor overcame obstacles to improve her quality of life when appropriate resources seemed out of reach.  These obstacles and challenges associated with TBI survivors include many skills associated with execution functions of the brain.  These skilled functions can be thought of as the command center of the brain that controls the cognitive processes such as decision-making, impulse control, attention, emotional regulation, and working memory.

Here is the first part of her story.

Healing is a continual process, but for this TBI Survivor, I made a choice to overcome obstacles instead of being overcome by them. Do not get me wrong, there have been, and still are some tough days, but with determination and a willingness to change, anything is possible.

What Happened…

Over eleven years ago, my life drastically changed on a fall day as I was driving to Steamboat Springs, Colorado in a snowstorm for a class.  We all know how Colorado weather can be; sunny one minute, a few miles down the road and a few minutes later, a complete whiteout has greeted you with full force. As I was making the final turn toward the West Summit of Rabbit Ears Pass, I noticed a vehicle fish-tailing on their side of the road and decided to pull as far right on the shoulder as I could hoping the car would pass, I could make a sarcastic comment about their driving, then be back on the way to class.

I did not make it to class but, I did survive a head-on collision with the side of the other driver’s vehicle.  Not only was life as I knew it changed but my ambitions for my career were crushed as well.

What changed?

Well, I went from being a semi-respected member of the community to the town joke.

Memory, balance, speech, processing, and cognitive issues made me different; insignificant in the minds of many who, instead of trying to understand the abrupt challenges in my life, people chose to judge and diagnose me to be someone I was not.  I lost friends, family members had no idea how to deal with me or communicate with me so, it was just easier for them to write me off as a “freak”.  People I called friends called me, “different, odd, awkward, and consistently inconsistent”.  Great on the self-esteem, I tell you (sarcastically speaking).

There were limited resources within the community I lived and the husband at the time, scared the crap out of me when he drove me to and from doctor appointments and surgeries. It took me over a year to get behind the wheel again.The marriage did not survive, but my mild traumatic brain injury was not the only reason.

Do you know what it is like to walk into the store or post office and see people whisper into one another’s ear while looking at you from the corner of their eye? Nah, they were definitely not talking about me, and they were so secretive, I had not noticed. Right…

I apparently hired a lawyer to represent my best interests but I don’t recall signing the paperwork, but when it was all said and done, I was hurt in the accident so they could benefit from my pain and suffering.  On one of the few encounters I remember with the lawyer’s Junior Associate (my mood swings and emotional dysregulation were too much for the real lawyer), it was mentioned that I should lose my home, be broke, and accept that I would never have worth-while employment for the rest of my life.

I guess if I had bought into what they were selling, they would have gotten more of my settlement, and they got most of it. That was just enough motivation for me to realize I did not want to be the person they decided I was going to be.  Boy, did I make a few sharks angry.  Who cares about what their words did to my self-esteem?

Oh yeah, being different means being insignificant, right?  Wrong!

One afternoon a year-and-a-half after my accident, I sat at my kitchen table in despair, crying, and thought I could not live the way I had being living anymore. I was afraid to drive, the help I was getting was minimal, and the then husband was about as available as a live operator in a computer-operated call center. I was ready to give up and had grown resigned to the idea of my disappointing new life, trying to find acceptance of my circumstances even though I struggled to accept the new me.

It was tough because I could still remember how I use to be, I just did not know how to reach that person.  We had been permanently disconnected. I sat at that kitchen table and surrendered and prayed.  Something had to give. Does anyone reading this understand where I am coming from or what I am talking about?

Within my next post, I will share about healing; Lisa style.

Until next time……

Lisa Marie Ansell, Guest Blogger

If you have anything to share please feel free to reach out to me at www.razcoaching.com  or www. coachingacademics.com. [email protected] Or follow my www.Instagram.com/razcoaching. I do daily mini blogs with tips of inspiration. I post almost every day.  There’s something in there for you that can help you with your focus for the day.

5 Online School Survival Tips

5 Online School Survival Tips

5 Online School Survival Tip

We are in some really challenging times. The way we go about our life is changing minute by minute.

Are you finding yourself in new roles?

You might have just become a teacher or an academic coach and a home health care provider. Things that you didn’t typically think that would be in your repertoire but now are forced upon you by these new changes. Rightfully so, we need to be responsible citizens.

You might be feeling overwhelmed, confused and frustrated.

I want to ease some of that frustration and fear of what you are now being strapped with. If you are having to help a college student or a public school student at home, I will be able to offer you some advice.

This is what I do for a living every day.  For over 10 years, I have helped hundreds of students to be successful in their academic life and career planning. Specifically, I work with clients in organizing, time management, task initiation, planning, prioritizing and keeping them accountable. These are what we call the areas of executive functions.

How is this online format going to work?

Maybe they’ve had a class online before and it wasn’t successful for them. These can be triggers and barriers to their academic success in the coming weeks. So, I want to give you five online school survival tips to help get you started.

You got this!

I often tell my clients or parents of students that I work with what I do is very systematic and it can be done by anybody. The difference is that I’m a third party. So sometimes, when there are internal conflicts or triggers within families, it’s nice to have that third party. I know from firsthand because I certainly paid it forward within my own family and I would still do that today if needed.

So let’s get down to these strategies.

Advocate

I want to make this quick for you. When you start online schooling, it’s essential to be your own best advocate.  It’s important that you self-advocate if you’re not understanding something and need clarity. You need to reach out to your instructors.   You’re in charge of letting people know what you need best.

Now for a younger student, this is where the parent has to be intuitive. But it’s important to advocate and it’s going to take a while to get used to.

Start off with writing out what you need or what your student needs to be a successful online student. Share it with somebody that is helping you transition into this new learning environment.

Resources

Second of all, there are many resources in this day and age.  We are so lucky that we have resources such as online tutoring programs. A lot of the schools probably are going to be offering those. There’s online counseling you can seek as well. Just like myself, It’s really something that can be done through Skype Zoom or Facetime. It’s very common these days.

Make sure that you know what your resources are.

If you’re going to be struggling in one particular subject area and you know that you are going to need help, ask questions about available resources. And that goes back to being your own best advocate.

Goals

Goals are super important to set when you have a lot of unstructured time. When I’m working with clients that have online classes, the biggest pitfall for them is not setting weekly and daily goals. That’s a crucial part of what I do. They need to see what’s in front of them and what they want to get done each day and week.

When the instructors give you what they want you to do, take the initiative to set goals and structure your day accordingly. An example of setting goals might be: if your instructors are giving you weekly to-dos on a Sunday evening or Monday, start the week off with a goal-setting session. What is it that you need to accomplish by that Friday and budget your time accordingly for each class. Structure it so that you have built-in time for breaks lunches and tutoring time if you need that.

If you take the time to set the goals that will give you purpose each day and a focus which is an added bonus. Right now, I’m seeing a lot of students pretty bored even though they’re kind of excited to not be in classes. They may have a list of some things they can do around the house, but they’re not supposed to be outside interacting with other people in very large groups. There is only so much downtime they can have. And we really need a purpose and something to do for our mental health. Lay this out with them on a planner with each class and budget that time accordingly.   Map it out so that they have a purpose each day.  Match it with the weekly plan from the instructor.   Your student is going to have a daily purpose now.

Read The Instructions

It’s essential to look at the instructions and read the syllabus.  Now as easy and common sense as that sounds, I can’t tell you how many students that I work with that don’t read the instructions. They don’t look at the rubrics. They’re not following the syllabus.

The instructors are going to be communicating a lot via email and possibly sending documents for you to read and follow. If you have a student challenged with some of the executive functions, take the time during goal-setting to go over the syllabus for the week. Check the rubric if they’re doing a project so that they understand what is expected of them. This is an independence skill that even college students struggle with at times. They don’t take that time to just follow through to make sure that what they think the professor or teacher wants is actually what they think they need to do. There are often times when they’re mismatched. I cannot stress enough to take the time to read the materials.

Time To Organize with a planner

I do know there are a lot of instructors out there that are using individual Web sites that can be pretty confusing. So if you feel frustrated with too many instructional sites to coordinate, come up with a plan to take charge of your time and get organized with a planner.

I have a systematic way that I do it. Have all of your subjects across the top of your planner with the due dates set and then backfill it with how you are going to get it done.   Start with the end in mind. For example, if there is a project or a test, put that on planner and color code it red, so it stands out. I do it by the month and by the week with students so they can be very clear on what it is that’s important and then backfill it. The next step is to plan how you are going to meet that goal of the test,  paper, or project and backfill each step to make the work manageable.

Accountability

It is super important to hold them accountable each day. Not only are we taking charge of the time by getting organized, but they will also know what’s expected of them. The accountability I recommend is for whoever’s in charge of overseeing student work, whether it be an elementary, high school or college student, look at the progress at the end of the day. I have my clients color code a completed task as blue to show it completed.

I cannot stress accountability as a critical factor in your student’s success enough. In our distracted lives, we tend to forget to follow through on things. We set these goals. We are organized but we don’t follow through to make sure that it got done. In our current situation, most parents are juggling working out of their home, taking care of their family, trying to get groceries and maybe taking care of an elderly person. There’s a lot of stress and there’s a lot going on.

What I recommend and I do myself is to put reminders in my phone. I ask my clients to set reminders in their phones as well. The accountability check-ins at the end of the day improve academic success. Have some kind of reward in place when it does get done.   Make it something they can do like gaming or binge-watching a movie series are ideas.

The accountability is what’s going to make them feel accomplished every day. If the student does not get done or meets a daily goal, you’ve got the flexibility to be at home and plenty of time to complete it.

I hope that these tips helped you.

  1. Advocate for yourself
  2. Resources: make sure you’ve got them in place
  3. Goals: Set them each week
  4. Read the syllabus: make sure you understand what the instructors want (rubric)
  5. Take charge of your time and get organized with accountability.

 

If you do these five things, you will set yourself up during these challenging times for success.   You might just help your student become an independent learner by doing the work on his or her own.

Once you follow this for a few weeks, they will get into a routine and it will begin to flow.

It’s going to be a different home environment but you can get into this flow and be successful. This is a time when we really need to embrace our duties. Things are changing day by day but you can put into place a routine at home that your students can adjust to quickly.

 

Best of luck out there.

If you have anything to share please feel free to reach out to me at www.razcoaching.com  or www. coachingacademics.com. [email protected] Or follow my www.Instagram.com/razcoaching. I do daily mini blogs with tips of inspiration. I post almost every day.  There’s something in there for you that can help you with your focus for the day.