10 Myths about choosing a career debunked

10 Myths about choosing a career debunked

10 Myths Debunked and your Negative Beliefs

Many beliefs can limit yourself in pursuing your career or lead you down a career path that is not a good match for you.  It is important to know yourself and the type of career you are considering and the requirements you need to be successful in the career.  You could get headed in the wrong direction for years if you hold onto some of these beliefs that do not match up with your personal characteristics, interests and dream.

10 Myths about choosing a career debunked

1.  All people who are good at music make successful musicians.

The problem with this kind of statement is that it leaves out many details it takes to be a musician.  There are skills needed to be successful.  As well as knowing how to play music, there is a commitment to practice or interpersonal skills to help promote the music and financial components for budgeting.

2.  All people who learn differently (LD) should go to vocational training programs

People who learn differently and have a strong support system, have gone on to have great careers as in business, science and entertainment industry. There is a learned gift developed by having to navigate life when you have a learning difference. It is the tenacity to work through problems, rebound from failure and celebrate the smaller step successes as they learn patience.   If the passion and desire to work toward the career goal is there, you can reach it.

3. All people with ADHD are creative and should own businesses.

While creativity is a hallmark trait used to describe people with ADHD, it doesn’t mean they have the operation skills to own a business.  The skills it takes to own a business include time management, long-range thinking, financial discipline, interpersonal skills and more.  It takes a lot of hard work and knowing when to pull in help through resources to run a successful business.

4. All people with good grades become top professionals

People that inherently get good grades and don’t have to work hard in school may not have developed adequate coping skills needed to deal with the stress and obstacles. It can hinder themselves in striving for high professional success levels.

5. All people who are good with people should go into sales.

Excellent interpersonal skills are needed in the sales industry as well as a tough as nail attitude for rejection and failure.  If you are sensitive to rejection and struggle to motivate after a letdown, then sales can be a challenging field for you.

6.  All people who make career changes later in life are discriminated against.

People may fear what others may perceive with a late in life career change, but could they be curious and even envious?  YOU can be the trailblazer to model how it can be done for others.  Your perception may be at play in a situation like this.

7.  All people with good educational backgrounds do well in careers.

Education is just a piece of the puzzle that makes up what it takes to do well in a given career.   Education is another way to get an edge on your career, but the other factors are equally important.

8.  All people with special challenges can expect to achieve less in their lifetimes.

This is a great myth to bust as we can go through the list of people with challenges that have contributed enormously to our society.  Hellen Keller, Walt Disney, Albert Einstein, Keanue Reeves, just to name a few.

9.  All people who made career choice mistakes should start over

This is the time to pull together the lessons learned and see how it may apply to something within their career choice.  Within a career field, there are many options.  For example, If your dream was to be an actor because you love the creative aspect of films but found that you do not like the stress of memorizing lines,  look at closely related field within the film industry such as production management or scene development or  coaching.

10.  All people have one true career destiny.

It is unusual to find someone who has stayed within one career their whole life these days.  People have many options to work from home and this has opened up options for people to investigate free-lance fields that bring a variety of work options and paths to consider.  As we go through life, your needs and interests change.  Our society is accepting of new ways to employ people and judge their performance wherever they are based.  This lends itself to allowing people the freedom to pursue dreams that may not have been thought possible in the past.

Go for your potential in life!

by debunking these 10 Myths about choosing a career

There are many opinions out there for every statement made regarding a career path one might choose.  Do not limit your potential in life by believing everything at face value.  Look at the counter-argument like I did in the above scenarios. This type of critical response is a process to get in touch with your true inner beliefs.

If you have an interest and desire for a career path and see a personal limitation that would keep you from being successful, I encourage to go through the exercises of debunking the thought with an alternative view.  This could be the first step in gaining the courage to face a challenge with the attitude of how can I navigate in this career field WITH my limitation?  Is this an area I can work on to improve or do I need to find a modification or accommodation to be successful.  Turn to techniques that bringer you closer to realizing the dream career such visualization or enlisting someone that can help you develop strategies in your weaknesses.

Your determination and consistent pursuit of the career can happen.

One of the earliest documented stories that I am aware of dates back to the 1960s.  This was a period where people with disabilities where looked upon as defects and often hidden from the public by families out of shame and fear. Christy Brown, artist and author,     fought every day for something and struggled with his inner critic to motivate and persevere. He began his passion for painting and writing to escape his burden of daily living and earned enough from his work to earn a living.

His first published book was translated into 5 languages writing it on a typewriter using only his left toes. In the first chapter of the book, My Left Foot, Brown describes how he could not be truly happy in life if he viewed himself simply as a cripple.  He wanted more and created ways to make his dreams into realities despite not have arms not being able to walk.

He shattered these 10 Myths about choosing a career!

He says in a 1962 interview that it was when he was able to accept himself for who he was combined with the immense support of his family, that he was able to succeed in life.  He offers advice to other people with disabilities that, with the right support, you can overcome any challenge.  As he says, we all have challenges.  Perhaps it is simply a mindset that sets apart this remarkable early example of overcoming tremendous difficulties to reach a fulfilling career and life.

Christy Brown’s accomplishment included artists, internationally best selling author and poet.  This example of overcoming odds, fear, having courage and face stigmas and myth of people with disabilities in Dublin, Ireland, is quite remarkable at a time when people commonly institutionalized anyone with mental or physical disabilities. His life story may have set a precedent in other countries to shift their limiting beliefs of the capacity of people with disabilities as a collective force.  He is one of the first inspirations for any suffering with any type of challenge.

10 Myths about choosing a career debunked!

If you have anything to share please feel free to reach out to me at www.razcoaching.com  or www. coachingacademics.com. [email protected] Or follow my www.Instagram.com/razcoaching. I do daily mini blogs with tips of inspiration. I post almost every day.  There’s something in there for you that can help you with your focus for the day.

Your Career Blueprint

Your Career Blueprint

Your Career Blueprint Begins With Your Passion and Purpose

Passion and Purpose is The  Key To Building A Resume And Career Path

Live by your purpose and you will create an inner drive and passion to culminate  a life and career path uniquely yours….One that brings out the best version of yourself.

Over 50 percent of the current American workforce are unsatisfied with their current employment and career choice. Considering how many hours people spend at work, it would be a good idea to be among the other 50 percent who enjoy what they do for a living!

Choosing a career path that ignites your purpose and passion in life does not only lead to a higher level of success and satisfaction but fulfillment at work, research also suggests that it promotes long term happiness, and good health.

But for someone with ADHD this may be a daunting and  overwhelming task. 

Many find it easy to discover their mistakes and not their strengths, they may lack confidence in what they can and cannot do with all the struggles and challenges throughout their lives.   By breaking down the components that go into choosing a career and taking a deep look at how successes and personal struggles could serve as a tool for identifying some hidden talents, interests and skills, you can ignite your career path.

This is achievable when you follow a systematic approach to unearth your unique career that works just right for you.  Consider it a blueprint to your personal career path.

 Develop a blueprint that is authentically yours

A career blueprint  for your life will help to create a strong foundation and structure for career happiness.  You can compare it to building your dream house.  Would you build a house without a well thought out set of blueprints?   You might be able to pull it off but how stable would it be for future additions? You would want to put a lot of thought and time into making sure it was right for you. The structure of the house will determine how well you live your life and the problems you may encounter with it.  A well designed set of blueprints takes time, energy and passion.   It is key to apply this same process to finding a career meant just for you.

Without a career blueprint plan, it is difficult to think through possibilities of how your life experiences connect to your goals and how your career could adapt and grow with you over time.

Joe is a good example of someone who benefited from this process.  He was a college student who lacked a solid career plan.  He was taking classes to satisfy general requirements but did not know where to specialize his interests.  After going through this process, he found that his true passion and purpose was not in the engineering program he had originally thought was his path.   He has able to identify key elements that were important to him in a career and incorporated that into what he naturally was good at in college.  The great part was that it stayed within the engineering department, but shifted to a more environmental focus.  It took into account his desire for travel, continual learning and humanitarian efforts.  He was able to design a career blueprint to best set him up for success in this field with strategic action plans and milestones.

Some people may think it is too late in their career to start the blueprint. They may be burned out of their chosen career but feel they are too old and tired to recreate their life purpose.

It is never too late to start  creating a blueprint for your life!

And you don’t need to start from ground zero. Through this process, you can see connections that will propel you into your new career direction with your personal history, experiences and narrative.  Mary was able to rediscover her life’s passion and purpose by using this strategic process.

Mary was a marketing professional who loved her chosen career path.  She had felt  passion and purpose and never questioned her choices until she left the workforce for 20 years to raise her children.   Now an empty nester, she  was looking to redefine her life purpose and re-enter the workforce without spending years retraining to gain new skill sets.  She dug in deep to look at her blueprint she had created and found that her life experiences as a mom brought new skills, interests and passion.  She was able to find purpose and passion with her experiences that complimented her original career blueprint path where she was making over six figures. In fact, she ended up feeling MORE marketable as she made connections in her current life situation to her previous career experience that were very insightful.

The key to finding a career that gets your passion and purpose burning is to look at your life’s What, Why and How.

The What of the Blueprint

WHAT you want out of life such as  interests, values, and  personality factor into this equation.  You might even find that some of your desires were written by you at a young age. It may be a childhood dream that was imprinted into your mind when you did not have any distractions or life barriers creating doubts that could serve you in choosing the right career path.

Go through these questions and answer them.  Writing them down in a journal will help you see a pattern of your wants.

  •       What brings you joy?

    It is very important to take time in finding out who you are, ask yourself some important questions.  What makes me unique? There may be a special strength in your uniqueness. What are my values and beliefs? What are my fears?  Self-knowledge is a key step in designing a career path that works for you.

  •       What motivates and energizes you most?

    Another key factor in determining your career path in life is knowing what gets you motivated.  Anything that gets you motivated and keeps you energized is capable of sustaining you through the mundane or tough times in a career.

  •       What are you biggest interests?

    Knowing your interest is also very important while developing a career path. Your area of interest would be where your career is focused on. You might even find that some of your yearnings and fears were not written by you and don’t suit you now.

  •       Is there a major challenge you want to tackle in your life or career that is important to you?

    For instance, If you knew you only had one year to live, what would you want to do during this time?

 

You can start to identify a life pattern that will point you in the direction of a career blueprint meant just for you by answering these questions. This  will align with your plans and purpose in life as the foundation.

The Why of  your blueprint plan deepens your connection of what it is you want.   Taking a look at your unique WHY or Inner Narrative is a good place to start.  What is the voice inside your head telling you?

Why are you the way you are?

Desires, beliefs, values, and fears don’t materialize out of nowhere. Your values and personality are shaped during our lives in several ways.  They’re either developed over time by our internal consciousness or as observations made during our  life experiences. The key here is to identify the why and know yourself and how it factors into your career path.

Designing a career blueprint for you by taking proactive steps geared with this self-knowledge of who you are and what your wants are makes your career journey of planning and decision making solid and stream-lined.

The How to pull it together for your career blueprint plan

Now is the time to connect the dots and see the patterns emerge.  Identify career paths that fit into this using resources available to you.

Once you have a good understanding of your true authentic self of what you want and why you want it, create the career path.   Unpack the  box of expectations that you grew up with and make connections  between, values,  personality, strengths,  and start to identify paths that will relate to your personal dreams and goals.   Your career blueprint plan will start to take form and give you clarity and a vision that you can follow.

And for the skeptics

Yeah sure, things could change, and you may need to modify the plans over the years, but with a solid blueprint, the changes can be handled and accommodated and add value and character to your original plan as it did for Mary.

Your career path is a path that does not need to be a straight path.  This thought can leave people feeling panicked when they want to adapt or change their plan.  The career stakes become so high and feel unattainable which can leave people feeling stuck and confused.   It does not have to be this way.

Gone are the days of people choosing one career and never veering off from that path.

People are creating more of a portfolio of jobs that lead to a series of careers.  This can be exciting for someone that has a developed blueprint career path that takes into consideration all the elements to a passionate and purposeful career.  The path can have many elements to it that spur off the main course but contribute to the overall career goal.  Now more than ever a career path can have many twists and turns that lead to success, fulfillment and purpose.

Consider these point  in designing a career blueprint plan:

  •       Make meaningful connections in life experiences: self knowledge
  •       Investigate interests, skills, aptitudes, accomplishments, and challenges
  •       Identify patterns between, values, personality, strengths, and how it relates to career dreams and goals
  •       Build a vision board of what you want your career to look like
  •       Answer some self reflection questions: Is it truly your plan?
  •       Incorporate opportunities for growth and learning in your career

 

Take note of all the points listed above. Turn them into a manifesto.   When you feel overwhelmed and distracted from your purpose, go back to this statement as a guiding light in your career journey.

Build a career path that ignites your passion and purpose and never second guess your career choice.

This post is from the fall issue of Attention Magazine by Michelle Raz.

Personal Purpose In Your Life: Steps

Personal Purpose In Your Life: Steps

Personal Purpose

Andrew Carnegie talked about his purpose and goals he set in his life. “I am going to spend the first 40 years of my life creating a fortune and the second 40 years giving it all away.”  He developed the mindset to reach his goals with this statement.

Act without purpose, the lifestyle you are likely to create will be a wandering generality without achieving your true personal purpose in life.

When you live on purpose, you become passionate about being alive.

It starts with repeated thoughts of your dreams of who are and want to be that generate action. When these thoughts permeate your mind enough, they become programmed into your behavior.

To live with a personal purpose in life, begin by programming your unconscious mind.   A truly useful lifestyle focuses on the largest purpose you can realistically attain.

Have you defined your own personal purpose? If so, great!  Please share your story with me of how you did it through my many posts on Instagram @razcoaching.   If not, read on for some helpful steps.
Here are a few questions to get started towards defining your personal purpose in life. Take the time to write these down in a journal.
WHAT…..
  • motivates me in life?
  • wanted but never got in life?
  • energizes me?
  • Brings me the most joy?
  • Are my biggest interests?
  • Do you REALLY REALLY want in life?
Example answers could look like this:
My purpose is in life is to….
  •  serve the public
  • teach others
  • make enough money to retire at 40
  • help people find their passionate career
Having difficulty deciding what your life purpose is?  Think about answering these questions:
  1. If you have 6 months to live, what would you want to do?
  2. What would you do f you were not responsible for anyone but yourself?
  3. If you were to die today, what would you want your obituary to say?

 

I have been asked if I had found MY true personal purpose.   That is a fair question. I pondered this question as I created the curriculum for my mini career exploration course.   In this 4 course series, I exuberantly inspire other people to find their passion in life and work.

To answer the question, I had to pause and check-in with my inner voice.  The reaction is an affirmative and enthusiastic YES!

My journey in life has weaved a perfect pattern that I can confidently go in the direction of coaching others to chase their passion, interests and aspirations.  My own “can-do attitude” throughout my life has been an inspiration for many people.  This influences my coaching style.

I found myself in a position many times giving people advice and encouragement.  People did not see their own gifts, yet it appeared so evident to me.  Many struggled to understand the stepping-stones to their dreams when I saw several different ways they could achieve it.  It could be frustrating when others could not see the path to achieving their goals.

There was a time that I thought it best to keep my own thoughts and opinions to myself as I was fearful that I was coming across as a know it all or bossy friend.  As I look back, I am glad I did not give up on my personal purpose.

Through this journey, I found that my tendency to see the big picture and help people push through their obstacles just what coaching was about. When I realized that I did not OWN their failure or success but was a mere vehicle for their own self-discovery, my pathway to becoming a coach was set.

By learning how to ask the right questions, it inspired people to self-realize their strengths and potential.   It fueled them to seek their own path,  creating a passionate and authentic life.  This was when my belief patterns shifted from one of responsibility to one of enlightenment.

I often tell clients that I learn just as much from them as them from me.

Their stories and insights leave me in reflection after each session.  I have a custom of debriefing myself after each session to see what I take away from the session to add to my self-awareness and growth.  It is a profession that is constantly changing with new insights and techniques. I fully embrace my career path and walk away energized at the end of most sessions.  This is how I know that I have found my true authentic, passionate career and life purpose.

What can you envision for yourself?  What would leave you energized and fulfilled at the end of each day?

Be sure to complete the questions and answers to begin to see your own weave in life that points to your personal purpose.

Raz Coaching specializes in helping people with executive function challenges and find careers they will love and land them. Read more at www.razcoaching.com/about Or sign up for the weekly blog or purchase my new book Happiness+Passion+Purpose.  It is packed full of exercises and strategies you can put to use immediately.

 

 

Create Great Employees: Employers Listen Up!

How To Create Great Employees:  It is The Invisible Economic Strain In Our Workforce that you can change!

In this Episode Listen to Michelle Talk about this topic.  Create great employees:   In a labor market that is at a historic low, businesses are seeing a high rate of turnover and even ghosting in the workplace.  It is a costly trend. Companies are seeing the value in shifting how they train to retain their employees.  It is far less expensive to invest in quality training.  A community mindset work culture that promotes employee retention is best; rather than continually training new employees.  Also, this nurtured environment promotes employee’s self-worth.  The end result is better work engagement and deeper relationships with fellow colleagues.

The result is better morale, work productivity and lower employee turnover rates!

The positive workplace connections and better knowledge base for the demands of their job has the potential for big payoffs.  It is a benefit for the company in reduced hiring costs as well. This creates a win-win scenario.  Talks of expanding apprenticeship programs are on the rise.

In order for the efforts to be successful, it is important to understand what challenges this group faces.  As a result, this will ensure quality training for the companies that want to train and hire them.

According to research, there are approximately 20 million college students who entered college in the fall of 2018.  19.4% self-reported having a disability.  This number has nearly doubled from 10 years ago and the impact on the educational system has been tremendous.   Colleges across the U.S. are developing programs to meet the needs of these diverse students.  The most prevalent disability is ADHD, a neurologically based disorder.

Of the students surveyed, 79% of the students who reported a disability listed ADHD as their challenge.

As these students enter our workforce, it would be beneficial for us to help them transition with strong skillsets.   Often, these neurologically diverse groups need specific guidance and training. Unfortunately,  skill sets may be assumed and overlooked for the average employee. This invisible disability flies under the radar and yet has a very impactful effect on job success. 

 “knowledge itself is power.”

Michelle R. Raz, M.A. Ed., is a professional executive function coach and educational consultant. Raz Coaching specializes in helping people with executive function challenges find careers they will love and land them. Read more at www.razcoaching.com/about Or sign up for the weekly blog.   Or purchase my new book Happiness+Passion+Purpose.  It is full of exercises and strategies you can put to use immediately.

The Under Used Tactic to Land a Job: Informational Interviewing

The Under Used Tactic to Land a Job: Informational Interviewing

Informational interviewing might just be the best way to get a job and yet it is underused by most job seekers.  Whenever I work with a career development client and we get to the informational interviewing step, I am met with hesitance and  resistance. I get it!  Cold calling is a scary and dreaded way to talk to a potential employer, but it is so effective!

Really, the problem is that  It is misunderstood and overlooked as a means to get a foot in the door for a job.

Interview call

Think of an information interview meeting as a networking opportunity. This is a one-on-one meeting with a key person in a field that you have a high interest in.

It may be that you have preconceived ideas about a particular career. Information interviewing can give you a better sense of what it would be like to work in the field you’ve chosen. It is first-hand, realistic, information you can use to form your idea of your ideal career.

An informational interview is less formal than a real interview. It allows you the opportunity to show off your personality, your skills, interests, and aptitude in a semi-relaxed atmosphere. Because of this, you will likely come across as more authentic to the interviewer. An informational interview gives a prospective employer better insight into who you are, and how you might be a good fit for the organization in the near future. This is a win-win situation for everyone.

“Foot in the door”

At the typical interview that follows an application, you might feel that you’re in an interview mill—the interviewer bored with all the candidates and simply saying, “Next. Next,” after each interview. This may leave you feeling less than confident in your ability to outperform the next person. With an information interview, you aren’t going to be competing for a time slot, and chances are the interviewer has 15-20 minutes they can carve out of their busy day to talk shop. Many people enjoy this opportunity to talk about themselves, and about how they got to where they are, as well as to help young job-seekers find a springboard from which to launch their careers.

Because informational interviews are less formal—and stressful—the conversations usually flow easier.   Remember, you aren’t there to ask for a job. You’re only there to learn. You want information that will help guide you in the direction of the career best suited for YOU. This means you are the one in control of the questions and the outcome of the interview. This is a great time to let your guard down a little, let your true personality shine, as well as briefly showcase how your skills benefit the company. You can also take the opportunity to ask more strategic questions—questions that help you, but perhaps would not be appropriate at a real interview. You can ask about benefits, salary, and even the social climate of the organization without portraying yourself in a negative light.

Gain insight, and Practice Interviewing

This is the opportunity for you to come in prepared to ask the right questions. People enjoy telling their story and you can get a real sense of what the company or career might be like, and so determine whether your chosen career is truly a good fit for you.

Additionally, if some parts of the interview process intimidate you, this is an excellent way to come up with a game-plan and practice. Remember practice ONLY makes for improvement.

Mentorship

If you feel a connection with the person you meet with, you may well have lucked into a mentoring relationship opportunity. Your interviewer might really be impressed with the initiative you show by requesting an informational interview, and may be willing to offer further advice and support. And this goes both ways. Because of the rapport you build in this interview, you yourself might ask for further guidance via follow ups which we’ll talk about later in this chapter.

How to conduct yourself at the interview

  • You should regard each interview as a business appointment and conduct yourself in a professional manner.
  • Write a THANK YOU NOTE to the people you have interviewed. Report back to them if you have followed up on any suggestions.

The last thing to remember is that informational interviews are extremely effective. How effective? According to Dr. Randall Hansen, founder of Quintessential Careers, one of the oldest and most comprehensive career development sites on the web, “While one out of every 200 resumes (some studies put the number as high as 1,500 resumes) results in a job offer, one out of every 12 informational interviews results in a job offer.”

Informational Interviews are so effective that despite that the stated aim is NOT to get a job, many  Informational Interviews still end up with a job offer.

So, go ahead and pick up that phone, you may just land a job!

To read more about interviewing, resumes and finding your passion career, purchase my book

Happiness + Passion + Purpose Book A Step By Step Guide On How To Nourish The Patterns Of Your Life Into The Job You Will Love And Land It!